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ICU nurses earns award for compassion to a couple with COVID-19

today03/09/2021 11

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Katie Clark and Michael King, both overnight ICU nurses at TidalHealth Peninsula Regional, went above and beyond to help two married patients. For their outstanding kindness and compassion, they have earned the Daisy Award for Extraordinary Nurses.

 

Nursing supervisor Tina Martin noted: “Caring for patients in the ICU and at any level of care can be physically, mentally, and emotionally challenging at times. As nurses, we were tested even further with the introduction of the COVID-19 virus. When caring for a husband and wife in the Intensive Care Unit, Michael and Katie showed immense compassion for this couple.”

 

“The couple fought long and hard to battle COVID-19. When their family decided that their loved ones had fought long enough, they decided to withdraw support and make the couple comfortable and allow them to pass on. When the decision was made, Michael and Katie ensured the couple could be together through this journey. Michael and Katie contacted family via video call so they could see their loved ones and be with them. They moved her into her husband’s room, put down the side rails, joined their hands and allowed the couple to be as one as they passed on. He passed first and she followed him only eight minutes later.”

 

“While death is sad in any case, a silver lining for this couple is that they were able to be together and they did not have to know life without their person. Nurses have the unique ability to allow the dying process to hurt just a little less for families and I know this family felt comforted knowing their loved ones were together when they passed.”

 

The two nurses were honored with the Daisy Award in a ceremony before their colleagues. They received a certificate commending her for being extraordinary nurses, which reads: “In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people.” They also received a sculpture called A Healer’s Touch, hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe in Zimbabwe.

 

The not-for-profit DAISY Foundation is based in Glen Ellen, CA, and was established by family members in memory of J. Patrick Barnes. Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little-known but not uncommon autoimmune disease. The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

 

President and Co-Founder of The DAISY Foundation Bonnie Barnes said, “When Patrick was critically ill, our family experienced firsthand the remarkable skill and care nurses provide patients every day and night. Yet these unsung heroes are seldom recognized for the super-human work they do. The kind of work the nurses at TidalHealth are called on to do every day epitomizes the purpose of The DAISY Award.”

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